Bitter News, 1-19-10

Headlines from the Bitter Newsroom as exciting as Tiger Woods’ Mississippi sex rehab adventure:

• Just like when your new favorite lesser-known band goes mainstream and does a tween movie soundtrack (ahem, what up, Bon Iver?), the dismal state of BigLaw has officially left the brooding world of legal blogs and gone mass market: An exposé in the New York Times “Fashion & Style” section.  It opens with a comparison to the cast of first-years starting at an opulent Los Angeles firm in the new ABC television series The Deep End (read our interview with the series creator David Hemingson), and draws immediate attention to how the show was developed in 2007—AKA BigLaw’s heydey.  In 2010, the piece points out, the reality of Big Firm life is drastically less rosy.  “As the profession lurches through its worst slump in decades, with jobs and bonuses cut and internal pressures to perform rising, associates do not just feel as if they are diving into the deep end, but rather, drowning.” It ends with a link to Lawyers With Depression.  Got a feel for the story yet?  [The New York Times]

• There are several interesting things about the Conan O’Brien / Jay Leno / NBC debacle.  One of them is watching “Asian Conan” and “Asian Leno” street fight to the death.  The other is the legal issues surrounding Conan’s contract as he prepares to walk away from NBC.  Not having a timeslot specified might end him up in good shape after all.  [The Am Law Daily]

• On the CBS side of late night, Manhattan State Supreme Court Justice Charles Solomon rejected a motion to dismiss the extortion case against TV producer Robert “Joe” Halderman for allegedly trying to blackmail Late Show host David Letter over trysts with staffers.  Solomon also smacked down Halderman’s attempt to use the Tiger Woods defense.  Look for a trial later this year.  [E! Online]

• In the mid-nineties, Derek Dooley left his Georgia JD and law practice behind at age 27 to follow a dream—and in his father’s footsteps.  Last weekend, Dooley became the newest head football coach in SEC, taking over the Tennessee Volunteers.  Fellow lawyer/coach Mike Leach might be a hint jealous.  He’s busy cracking the whip on his lawyers to gather evidence.  [Los Angeles Times]

• A lawyer is guaranteed to win today’s senate race in Massachusetts.  [WSJ Law Blog]

• Speaking of lawyers with depression, one Temple University law student may have premature case right about now.  3L Gerald Ung allegedly shot Villanova graduate Ed DiDonato early yesterday on the street in Philadelphia, and it was caught on tape by the local Fox affiliate (see video below.) [Philly.com]

• Meet “Marcus,” the countries first legal male prostitute now serving customers in Nevada.  In case you need some sort of reference point to get your head around the idea: He likens himself to a white-male-with-tattoos version of Rosa Parks—who fucks people for money out in the dessert.  The civil rights and gigolo rights movements are basically synonymous.  [Details Magazine]

• Burning legal question: “I’m eager to get busy making this sex tape but need some quick advice from counsel. What forms do we need to fill out? We’re ready to roll!” Obvious answer: Consent form 2257, of course.  [Legal Blog Watch]

• Being detoured from BigLaw and sent to work in public service comes with questions.  And Fordham Law grad Chris Reid takes them on.  [City Room @ NYT]

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Headlines from the Bitter Newsroom as exciting as Tiger Woods’ Mississippi sex rehab adventure:

• Just like when your new favorite lesser-known band goes mainstream and does a tween movie soundtrack (ahem, what up, Bon Iver?), the dismal state of BigLaw has officially left the brooding world of legal blogs and gone mass market: An exposé in the New York Times “Fashion & Style” section.  It opens with a comparison to the cast of first-years starting at an opulent Los Angeles firm in the new ABC television series The Deep End (read our interview with the series creator David Hemingson), and draws immediate attention to how the show was developed in 2007—AKA BigLaw’s heydey.  In 2010, the piece points out, the reality of Big Firm life is drastically less rosy.  “As the profession lurches through its worst slump in decades, with jobs and bonuses cut and internal pressures to perform rising, associates do not just feel as if they are diving into the deep end, but rather, drowning.” It ends with a link to Lawyers With Depression.  Got a feel for the story yet?  [The New York Times]

Read more from the Bitter Newsroom.

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