Bitter News, 1-22-10

Headlines from the Bitter Newsroom that are a ray of sunshine—like Britney in court:

• It’s harder to cross examine a star football coach than it is a Catholic priest—so we’ve heardMike Leach would likely be no exception.  Which is probably why a judge ordered Leach’s case claiming wrongful termination from Texas Tech should be settled in mediation.  [USA Today]

• In other sports news: Who wants to sign up for the new all-white basketball league?  Needless to say, it raises sufficient “interesting theoretical legal questions about private entities setting up entry barriers.” [WSJ Law Blog]

• Ratings for the premiere of law firm dramedy The Deep End were kind of shallow Thursday night.  However, future-lawyer Vinny and the gang fist pumped the Jersey Shore finale through the roof—scoring record numbers.  [SeattlePI]

• Remember how there was that The New York Times piece on the disenchantment of BigLaw that was published on Sunday?  “As the profession lurches through its worst slump in decades, with jobs and bonuses cut and internal pressures to perform rising, associates do not just feel as if they are diving into the deep end, but rather, drowning.” Ring any bells?  Sadly and ironically, a day later, John Mason Mings, an IP partner in the Houston office of Baker & Hostetler, committed suicide.  Mings certainly wasn’t the first lawyer to take his own life.  But more shouldn’t follow either.  Don’t feel isolated.  Seek help when it’s getting bleak.  Maybe Lawyers With Depression can help.  [The Am Law Daily]

• Associates, take ownership of your legal work.  Nuff’ said.  [The Legal Intelligencer]

• The Prop. 8 same-sex marriage trial is really heating up in California.  And it’s so important that even straight people should follow what’s going on.  Here’s why.  Live blogging[Huffington Post]

• The FBI allegedly broke the law by illegally obtaining the phone records of reporters—sometimes replacing the legal process with simply a Post-It note.  And as the report on the breach of wiretap laws becomes more apparent, there’s no reason to be concerned.  Obama said it was cool.  And that makes it legal.  Right?  [TechDirt]

• John Patten, the defense lawyer for NYC police officer Richard Kern, has a perfect defense for his client.  He told the court that Officer Kern didn’t sodomize the victim, Michael Mineo, with his baton after catching him smoking pot in a subway station—instead, Mineo was likely “digging into his backside” and caused the anal lacerations himself because he’s a scam artist.  So it looks like you really can go F yourself.  [New York Post]

• Mischa, Mischa, Mischa.  Can’t handle the Law.  Actress Mischa Barton was sued by her landlord yesterday after allegedly skipping out on her $7,000-a-month rent.  And around the same time, she was bombing her scenes as a guest star on the set of Law & Order: SVU[New York Daily News]

• Since disbarred attorney Scott Rothstein is in jail waiting to plead guilty to charges connected to a $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme, he doesn’t need his law firm office anymore.  So the contents are being auctioned off on Saturday.  But the action house is recreating the office in its original state including the desk where he ran his empire all the way down to where each one-of-a-kind $5,000 pen laid when they first entered.  [WSVN]

• Once bitten, twice shy. Samantha Geimer, the victim in the Roman Polanski rape case is taking a new legal step on the director’s behalf: She’s “asking that a Los Angeles court force U.S. authorities to abandon their ongoing attempt to extradite the filmmaker from Switzerland.” [Los Angeles Times]

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Headlines from the Bitter Newsroom that are a ray of sunshine—like Britney in court:

• It’s harder to cross examine a star football coach than it is a Catholic priest—so we’ve heardMike Leach would likely be no exception.  Which is probably why a judge ordered Leach’s case claiming wrongful termination from Texas Tech should be settled in mediation.  [USA Today]

• In other sports news: Who wants to sign up for the new all-white basketball league?  Needless to say, it raises sufficient “interesting theoretical legal questions about private entities setting up entry barriers.” [WSJ Law Blog]

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