Bitter News, 2-4-10

Headlines from the Bitter Newsroom going at it like John Stewart and Bill O’Reilly, Round 1:

• They come from a land down under.  But did Men at Work plagiarize a riff from a popular nursery rhyme when they made their global hit song declaring that they do?  An Australian Federal Court ruled that the famous flute solo in the 80’s anthem “Down Under” was lifted from the children’s tune “Kookaburra.” And now it’s a legal battle that could cost Colin Hay and Men at Work 60% of the song’s royalties—potentially reducing them to a strict diet of Vegemite sandwiches.  (Video below.)

[Legal Blog Watch]

News continued below video.

• A lawyer is suing Sallie Mae for violating consumer protection laws and annoying the shit out of him with incessant phone calls about his late law school student loan payments.  [Newser.com]

• A prospective law school student is already acting like a lawyer. Matthew Scott Jones is seeking a court order to force the Law School Admissions Council to give him twice as much time to take the LSAT to accommodate his ADHD.  Oh, I really hope it works out.  America really needs hyper lawyers with a “competence level [that] is below that expected in comparison to most people.” [Texas Lawyer]

• When your accelerators stick and your brakes don’t really work that well, you’re sort of driving your company right off a cliff.  Toyota’s legal woes are pilling up pretty fast.  “[I]t’s going to be a formidable legal armada that Toyota is going to have to deal with.” [The National Law Journal]

• Maybe Justices Thomas and Kennedy are a little jealous of Alito because they both got kinda mouthy this week.  Thomas was lost, but thanks to law, he’s now found.  [Washington Post | LA Times]

• Proof that babies are irresistible!  Criminal defense lawyer Adam “Bulletproof” Reposa, formerly of the website DWIbadass.com, was sentenced to 90 days in jail after making an “obscene gesture” at a judge in court.  But cue the heart melting and breaking: He has a baby due in March!  How could any family man live with himself if he missed that?  So a visiting judge granted his request to lighten his sentence to 10 days in jail and three months house arrest.  But in an odd twist—which is crazy because what beaming father-to-be would ever miss these anyway—the judge also required him to “attend every doctor visit for his unborn child between now and the March due date.” That’s one hell of a heartwarming story for the baby book.  [WISHtv.com]

News continued below video.

• And just because Reposa’s DWIbadass.com no longer exists doesn’t mean there aren’t any other outrageous online legal resources out there.  Here’s a list of the five “creepiest defense attorney websites.” [Cracked.com]

• They say that when you buy a pirated DVD or a fake Gucci you’re putting money in Al Qaeda’s pockets.  But what about when lawyers aid money laundering by foreigners?  A Senate subcommittee wants to close the legal loophole on how the USA Patriot Act only applies to banks and “foreign political figures were able to funnel large sums of possibly tainted money into the United States because lawyers and other professionals are not required to inquire about the sources of the funds.” [Reuters]

• Are law professors just plain lazy?  Short answer: Yes.  [WSJ Law Blog]

• Uma…Oprah.  Oprah…Uma.  MacGyver…MacGruber.  MacGruber…MacGyver.  Discuss the parody.  In court.  [THR, Esq.]

• Hilary Swank is going to star in Erin Brockovich 2 Betty Anne Waters this fall.  It’s about a single mom who gets her GED and puts herself through law school.  [Reuters]

• As of January, attorney Scott Blackmun is the new chief executive officer of the U.S. Olympic Committee.  Just in time for great tickets to the Vancouver games.  [The National Law Journal]

• Should I become a lawyer or a physical therapist…or a mermaid?  [Physical-Therapists.org]

Check out more news from previous days.

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Headlines from the Bitter Newsroom going at it like John Stewart and Bill O’Reilly, Round 1:

• They come from a land down under.  But did Men at Work plagiarize a riff from a popular nursery rhyme when they made their global hit song declaring that they do?  An Australian Federal Court ruled that the famous flute solo in the 80’s anthem “Down Under” was lifted from the children’s tune “Kookaburra.” And now it’s a legal battle that could cost Colin Hay and Men at Work 60% of the song’s royalties—potentially reducing them to a strict diet of Vegemite sandwiches.  (Video below.)

[Legal Blog Watch]

• A lawyer is suing Sallie Mae for violating consumer protection laws and annoying the shit out of him with incessant phone calls about his late law school student loan payments.  [Newser.com]

Read more from the Bitter Newsroom.

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